Life Satisfaction with Identity Experiences

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To address the second hypothesis of the relationship between study variables with life satisfaction, the same steps for hierarchical linear regression were taken with life satisfaction as the outcome variable. Results of the regression analysis did not provide confirmation for the research hypothesis. The results of a hierarchical linear regression suggest that a significant proportion of total variation in life satisfaction was predicted by recent life experiences, R2 = .17, F(1, 117) = 24.517, p = .000. After controlling for recent life experiences, racial malleability, appreciation of human differences, racial regard, lack of family acceptance, and identity questioning did not account for a significant amount of the variance in life satisfaction, (R2 change = .05, F change = 1.345, p = .251). The addition of the interaction terms did not account for a significant portion of the variance in life satisfaction (R2 change = .04, F change = 1.322, p = .266). (See Table 6). It is important to note that racial malleability did significantly predict life satisfaction, b = .13, t = 2.026, p = .043. This suggests that there is a relationship between being more racial malleable and having more life satisfaction. The Role of Authenticity in Multiracial Well-Being The second aim of this study was to explore the role of authenticity and how it is related to racial malleability and psychological well-being. This aim was exploratory as there is no existing research exploring the role of authenticity in multiracial well-being. In order to explore the relationship between authenticity, racial malleability, and psychological well-being, preliminary analyses were conducted.

Preliminary Analyses for Authenticity The psychometric properties of the measures were described in the previous chapter. (See Table 3). Racial malleability was also significantly correlated with the Accepting External Influence subscale of the Authenticity Scale (r = .17, p = .042). Recent life experiences significantly correlated with the Self-Alienation subscale of the Authenticity Scale (r = .43, p = .000). (See Table 5). Self-alienation significantly correlated with both perceived stress (r = .54, p = .000) and life satisfaction (r = -.34, p = .000). Specifically, these correlations suggest that the more self-alienated individuals reported feeling the more they perceived stress and the less life satisfied they reported feeling. The other two subscales of the Authenticity Scale, accepting external influences (r = .21, p = .012) and authentic living (r = -.19, p = .033) significantly correlated with perceived stress. This suggests that an increase in accepting external influences is related to reporting more perceived stress, while an increase in authentic living is related to reporting less perceived stress. Tests for multicollinearity indicated that a very low level of multicollinearity with perceived stress was present (VIF = 1.04 for racial malleability, 1.48 for accepting external influences, 1.33 for authentic living, and 1.63 for selfalienation). Regarding life satisfaction, tests indicated that a very low level of multicollinearity was present (VIF = 1.30 for racial malleability, 1.46 for accepting external influences, 1.34 for authentic living, and 1.56 for self-alienation). The Role of Authenticity To assess the second aim of this study, the relationships among variables was explored utilizing a hierarchical regression model in order to see how much of the variance in perceived stress and life satisfaction was accounted for by racial malleability  and authenticity. Given the low correlation between racial malleability and the outcome variables, a mediation analysis could not be performed, however, there is the potential that authenticity may enhance the relationship between predictor and outcome variables. To test for moderation the following steps were taken. The covariate, recent life experiences, was entered into the first step of the regression model. In the second step of the model, racial malleability, accepting external influences, authentic living, and selfalienation were entered. The interaction terms were entered into the third step. These steps were completed for both perceived stress and life satisfaction. Authenticity and Perceived Stress. To test the exploratory question of how authenticity and racial malleability relate perceived stress, a hierarchical linear regression analysis was performed. The results of a hierarchical linear regression suggest that a significant portion of total variation in perceived stress was predicted by recent life experiences, R2 = .35, F(1, 112) = 59.622, p = .000. After controlling for recent life experiences, racial malleability, accepting external influences, authentic living, and selfalienation accounted for a significant amount of the variance in perceived stress, (R2 change = .12. F = 6.261, p = .000). Specifically, racial malleability did not significantly predict perceived stress, b = -.01, t = -.173, p = .863. While self-alienation did significantly predict perceived stress, b = .36, t = 3.959, p = .000. Accepting external influence, b = .09, t = .897 p = .370, and authentic living, b = -.16, t = -1.128, p = .259, were not significant predictors of perceived stress. Therefore, self-alienation appeared to have a significant role given the main effect on the variance in perceived stress. The addition of the moderators did not significantly improve prediction (R2 change = .02, F = 1.486, p = .223). (See Table 7). The significant direct effect of self-alienation on perceived stress suggests that the more one feels self-alienated and not sure of who they are, the more likely they are to perceive higher levels of stress. Authenticity and Life Satisfaction. To test the exploratory question of how authenticity and racial malleability relate to life satisfaction, a hierarchical linear regression analysis was performed. Results of the regression analysis further clarify the research question regarding the role of authenticity in the relationship between racial malleability and psychological well-being. The results of a hierarchical linear regression suggest that a significant portion of total variation in life satisfaction was predicted by recent life experiences, R2 = .17, F(1, 114) = 22.794, p = .000. After controlling for recent life experiences, racial malleability, accepting external influences, authentic living, and self-alienation accounted for a significant amount of the variance in life satisfaction, (R2 change = .10, F = 3.775, p = .006). Specifically, racial malleability did significantly account for some of the variance in life satisfaction, b = .13, t = 2.155, p = .031. Additionally, self-alienation significantly accounted for some of the variance in life satisfaction, b = -.35, t = -3.491, p = .000. Thus, there is a main effect of self-alienation on life satisfaction and perceived stress; self-alienation plays a significant role as a factor of authenticity in multiracial well-being. The addition of authenticity moderators were not significant (R2 change = .03. F = 1.445, p = .234). (See Table 7).

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